sport_volley

Passé composé

 

What is it?

The Compound past:

The compound past, or past perfect (passé composé in French) is similar to the English past simple, and is used to refer to an action or an event in the past that is completed, or completed with effects continuing in the present.

e.g.: Je suis allé faire les courses ce matin. I went to do the shopping this morning.

e.g.: Nous sommes allés à York la semaine dernière. We went to York last week.

e.g.: Il a dormi tout l'après-midiHe has been sleeping the whole afternoon.

e.g.: Vous avez eu de la chance ! You were lucky! or: You are lucky!

Difference with imperfect:

If you are describing an event, focusing on its process, you need the imperfect (often translated by a past progressive in English e.g.: I was eating). If you are speaking about an event that occured at a particular time (usually adding a clear time reference), you are speaking about it as a whole thing that happened at some point in the past: you then need a compound past (usually translate by a past simple in English e.g.: I ate at twelve today).

Contrarily to the imperfect, the compound past doesn't focus on the process but on the result: the action or event is considered as a whole thing, with a beginning and an end.

> Imperfect: the event is lasting for some time and is not completed (focus on the progress, not the result).

> Coumpound past: the event is completed and is referred to as a "dot" on a time line (focus on the result, not the progress).

e.g.: The man was running (description of the ongoing event happening in the past) and suddenly fell (mention of what happened as a whole thing). In French: L'homme courait et soudainement est tombé.

Now, compare the sentences below:

• J’ai marché sur le port hier soir. I had a walk in the harbour yesterday.

• Je marchais sur le port quand j’ai vu l'accident. I was walking in the harbour when I saw the accident.

In the second sentence above, the first phrase uses the imperfect to provide a description of the background (what is happening and in process), whereas the second phrase refers to the fact of witnessing an accident as a whole thing.

Difference with French simple past (or historic past):

Compound past and simple past have a similar meaning in French. The main difference is that the simple past in not used any longer in spoken French. It is only used in written language, especially in literature and newspapers. On the contrary, compound past can be found both in spoken and written language.

Another difference between both is that the simple past describes an action or event which is totally over and without any continuing consequence in the present. This is why it is also called "historic past", as it is commonly used to speak about facts that happened in history. On the contrary, the compound past can describe an event that have continuying consequences for the present, in which case it may be translated by a present perfect in English. Compare:

• Elle partit et ne revint jamais. She left and never came back.

• Elle est sortie mais n'est toujours pas revenue. She went out but hasn't come back yet.

027 past

How is it formed?

Model cplx 2

Form

• Select the auxiliary verb être or avoir (present) 

• Use the past participle form of the verb to conjugate.

 

Tips

► Most verbs are conjugated with avoir

► Reflexive verbs are always conjugated with être

► If the auxiliary is être, the verb must agree (gender/number) with the subject. 

Click here to know how to conjugate être and avoir (present).

► The past participle of verbs ending in -er (90% of French verbs) is always "-é".

 

 

(Person)

 

Je  

tu  

il/elle/on  

 

nous  

vous  

ils/elles  

(either être...)

 

suis

es

est

 

sommes

êtes

sont

(...or avoir)

 

ai

as

a

 

avons

avez

ont

(Verb)

 

Stem-Past participle ending

Stem-Past participle ending

Stem-Past participle ending

 

Stem-Past participle ending

Stem-Past participle ending

Stem-Past participle ending

Examples

Verbs using avoir

ACHETER

J' ai acheté

Tu as acheté

Il acheté

Nous avons acheté

Vous avez acheté

Ils ont acheté

FINIR

J' ai fini

Tu as fini

Il fini

Nous avons fini

Vous avez fini

Ils ont fini

VOULOIR

J' ai voulu

Tu as voulu

Il voulu

Nous avons voulu

Vous avez voulu

Ils ont voulu

ÊTRE

J' ai été

Tu as été

Il été

Nous avons été

Vous avez été

Ils ont été

VOIR

J' ai eu

Tu as eu

Il eu

Nous avons eu

Vous avez eu

Ils ont eu

Verbs using être

TOMBER

Je suis tombé

Tu es tombé

Il est tombé

Nous sommes tombés

Vous êtes tombés

Ils sont tombés

ARRIVER

Je suis arrivé

Tu es arrivé

Il est arrivé

Nous sommes arrivés

Vous êtes arrivés

Ils sont arrivés

VENIR

Je suis venu

Tu es venu

Il est venu

Nous sommes venus

Vous êtes venus

Ils sont venus

NAÎTRE

Je suis

Tu es 

Il est

Nous sommes s

Vous êtes s

Ils sont s

MOURIR

Je suis mort

Tu es mort

Il est mort

Nous sommes morts

Vous êtes morts

Ils sont morts

Reflexive verbs

SE COUCHER

Je me suis couché

Tu t'es couché

Il  s'est couché

Nous nous sommes couchés

Vous vous êtes couchés

Ils se sont couchés

SE LAVER

Je me suis lavé

Tu t'es lavé

Il  s'est lavé

Nous nous sommes lavés

Vous vous êtes lavés

Ils se sont lavés

S'HABILLER

Je me suis habillé

Tu t'es habillé

Il  s'est habillé

Nous nous sommes habillés

Vous vous êtes habillés

Ils se sont habillés

SE MAQUILLER

Je me suis maquillé

Tu t'es maquillé

Il  s'est maquillé

Nous nous sommes maquillés

Vous vous êtes maquillés

Ils se sont maquillés

SE PERDRE

Je me suis perdu

Tu t'es perdu

Il  s'est perdu

Nous nous sommes perdus

Vous vous êtes perdus

Ils se sont perdus